Archive for the nigeria Category

Review of The Up-Country Man “An Absolutely Riveting Book”

Posted in africa, Biafra, Civil War, nigeria, Reviews, Tribalism, West Africa on 27/06/2013 by Kenneth C. Ryeland

UCMcover16x24

An absolutely riveting book! The events in Biafra in the sixties seem like an age away, so this is real, living history. It all happened less than 50 years ago and is reliably and entertainingly recounted by the author who lived through it all. An excellent book if you were alive at the time and want an inside view of what was happening, or for younger people, who are bored by the safe, gap years of today’s litigious culture and yearn for the days of real life and death adventure.

***** (five stars)
S.I.

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Are You a Fellow MV Isonzo Refugee?

Posted in africa, Biafra, Civil War, nigeria, West Africa with tags , , , , , , on 10/04/2013 by Kenneth C. Ryeland
The evacuation ship: MV ISONZO

The evacuation ship: MV ISONZO

On a hot, sultry afternoon in July 1967, a small Italian freighter eased itself away from the quay at Port Harcourt in Eastern Nigeria, or Biafra as it had become by then. On board were 800 or so expatriates who were being evacuated from Biafra to the comparative safety of Lagos in Federal Nigeria. The ship, the MV Isonzo, was the only way out of the rebel enclave as Federal Nigerian troops closed in on the township for the final assault. There were many nationalities on board including British, American, Dutch, Israeli, Japanese and Italian, all of whom had previously worked in Enugu, the regional capital, or Port Harcourt the region’s major sea port. An account of my adventures in Biafra is detailed in my memoir entitled The Up-Country Man, which is featured on this page. It’s the story of a young British engineer, (me), straight out from England, who was posted to Enugu just as the Nigerian civil war began and the book relates some of the problems and difficulties encountered by a white man living in an enclave of determined indigenous people. Roadblocks, marauding Biafran soldiers, food shortages and the secret police caused many problems for the small contingent of Europeans remaining in Enugu, not to mention the trauma of the final evacuation itself. Since the evacuation, I have only managed to make contact with one or two people who were aboard the Isonzo, or resident in Port Harcourt at the time and I would like to make contact with others if possible. Were you on that small Italian freighter? Do you know anyone who was on that ship? If so, perhaps you would be kind enough to make contact using the comments facility or by means of my e-mail address (top right hand column).

Second Edition of The Up-Country Man

Posted in africa, Biafra, Civil War, nepotism, nigeria, Tribalism, West Africa on 18/08/2012 by Kenneth C. Ryeland

It is now almost fifty years since the Biafran war began and to mark this tragic occurrence I have updated my memoir, The Up-Country Man: A personal account of the first one hundred days inside secessionist Biafra, to include more information. The Kindle and Smashwords e-versions have been updated too and the new print version is available from Lulu and at Amazon.